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Person—glycosylated haemoglobin level, code N

Identifying and definitional attributes

Metadata item type:Help on this termData Element
Short name:Help on this termGlycosylated haemoglobin level
Synonymous names:Help on this termHbA1c level
METeOR identifier:Help on this term589601
Registration status:Help on this termHealth, Standard 13/03/2015
Indigenous, Endorsed 13/03/2015
Definition:Help on this termA person's glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level, as represented by a code.
Data Element Concept:Person—glycosylated haemoglobin level

Value domain attributes

Representational attributes

Representation class:Help on this termCode
Data type:Help on this termNumber
Format:Help on this termN
Permissible values:Help on this term
ValueMeaning
1Less than or equal to 7% (less than or equal to 53 mmol/mol)
2Greater than 7% but less than or equal to 8% (greater than 53 mmol/mol but less than or equal to 64 mmol/mol)
3Greater than 8% but less than 10% (greater than 64 mmol/mol but less than 86 mmol/mol)
4Greater than or equal to 10% (greater than or equal to 86 mmol/mol)

Source and reference attributes

Submitting organisation:Help on this termAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Data element attributes

Collection and usage attributes

Guide for use:Help on this term

Prior to 2013, glycosylated haemoglobin levels were usually recorded as a percentage in Australia. However, the International HbA1c Consensus Committee recommends that the best way to record glycosylated haemoglobin levels is in mmol/mol. This recommendation was supported by the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists, the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the Australian Diabetes Educators Association, and the Australian Diabetes Society. Following this, HbA1c results are now being recorded in two ways in clinical systems; as a percentage and as mmol/mol.

HbA1c results should be reported for all clients, regardless of the manner in which their HbA1c is recorded.

Comments:Help on this term

Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is an index of average blood glucose level for the previous 2 to 3 months and is used to monitor blood sugar control in people with diabetes.

Source and reference attributes

Submitting organisation:Help on this termAustralian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Relational attributes

Related metadata references:Help on this term

Supersedes Person—glycosylated haemoglobin level, code N Health, Standard 07/12/2011

Implementation in Data Set Specifications:Help on this term
All attributes +

Indigenous primary health care DSS 2014-15 Health, Superseded 13/03/2015
Indigenous, Archived 13/03/2015

DSS specific attributes +

Indigenous primary health care DSS 2015-17 Health, Superseded 25/01/2018
Indigenous, Archived 27/02/2018

DSS specific attributes +

Indigenous primary health care NBEDS 2017–18 Health, Superseded 06/09/2018
Indigenous, Archived 22/10/2018

DSS specific attributes +

Indigenous primary health care NBEDS 2018–19 Health, Superseded 12/12/2018
Indigenous, Archived 02/04/2019

DSS specific attributes +

Indigenous primary health care NBEDS 2019–20 Health, Standard 12/12/2018
Indigenous, Endorsed 02/04/2019

DSS specific attributes +

Indigenous primary health care NBEDS 2020–21 Health, Candidate 02/09/2019

DSS specific attributes +
Implementation in Indicators:Help on this termUsed as numerator
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2014 Health, Superseded 13/03/2015
Indigenous, Archived 13/03/2015
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015 Health, Superseded 05/10/2016
Indigenous, Archived 20/01/2017
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015-2017 Health, Superseded 25/01/2018
Indigenous, Archived 27/02/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015-2017 Health, Superseded 17/10/2018
Indigenous, Archived 17/10/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2018-2019 Health, Standard 17/10/2018
Indigenous, Endorsed 17/10/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06a-Number of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2020–2021 Health, Candidate 13/09/2019
Indigenous, Final 08/08/2019
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2014 Health, Superseded 13/03/2015
Indigenous, Archived 13/03/2015
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015 Health, Superseded 05/10/2016
Indigenous, Archived 20/01/2017
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015-2017 Health, Superseded 25/01/2018
Indigenous, Archived 27/02/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2015-2017 Health, Superseded 17/10/2018
Indigenous, Archived 17/10/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2018-2019 Health, Standard 17/10/2018
Indigenous, Endorsed 17/10/2018
Indigenous primary health care: PI06b-Proportion of regular clients with Type II diabetes whose HbA1c measurement result was within a specified level, 2020–2021 Health, Candidate 13/09/2019
Indigenous, Final 08/08/2019
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