Australian Government: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare METeOR Home Page

Person—albuminuria status, code N{.N}

Identifying and definitional attributes

Metadata item type:Help on this termData Element
Short name:Help on this termAlbuminuria status
METeOR identifier:Help on this term666942
Registration status:Help on this termHealth, Candidate 15/05/2017
Definition:Help on this term

Whether there is excessive albumin in a person’s urine, as represented by a code.

Data Element Concept:Person—albuminuria status

Value domain attributes

Representational attributes

Representation class:Help on this termCode
Data type:Help on this termNumber
Format:Help on this termN{.N}
Maximum character length:Help on this term2
Permissible values:Help on this term
ValueMeaning
1Negative for albuminuria (normoalbuminuria)
2.1Positive for microalbuminuria
2.2Positive for macroalbuminuria
3Not tested
Supplementary values:Help on this term
9Not stated/inadequately described

Collection and usage attributes

Guide for use:Help on this term

CODE 1     Negative for albuminuria (normoalbuminuria)

Negative for albuminuria refers to urinalysis which is negative for excessive albumin in the urine (normoalbuminuria).

CODE 2.1     Positive for microalbuminuria

Positive for microalbuminuria refers to urinalysis which is positive for a small or moderate increase of albumin excretion in the urine.

CODE 2.2     Positive for macroalbuminuria

Positive for macroalbuminuria refers to urinalysis which is positive for a large increase of albumin excretion in the urine.

CODE 3      Not tested

Not tested refers to where no urinalysis for albuminuria was undertaken.

Collection methods:Help on this term

Where laboratory testing is used to determine albuminuria status the categorisation must be substantiated by clinical documentation such as an official laboratory report.

Source and reference attributes

Submitting organisation:Help on this term

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Origin:Help on this term

Kidney Health Australia (KHA) 2012. Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment (CARI) Guidelines. Diagnosis, classification and staging of chronic kidney disease. Sydney: KHA. Viewed 20 October 2015,  http://www.cari.org.au/CKD/CKD%20early
/Diag_Classification_Staging_ECKD.pdf
.

Johnson DW, Jones GR, Mathew TH, Ludlow MJ, Chadban SJ, Usherwood T et al. 2012. Chronic kidney disease and measurement of albuminuria or proteinuria: a position statement. Medical Journal of Australia 197(4):224-5.

Data element attributes

Collection and usage attributes

Guide for use:Help on this term

When the kidney is damaged, protein leaks into urine. Excessive amounts of protein in the urine (proteinuria), particularly the most abundant protein, albumin (albuminuria), are a key marker of kidney damage and of increased renal and cardiovascular disease risk. Screening and recording albuminuria status is an important step in identifying kidney damage.

Albuminuria status is categorised into three stages based on the amount of albumin being excreted in the urine; normal albumin excretion (normoalbuminuria), moderate albumin excretion (microalbuminuria), and severe albumin excretion (macroalbuminuria). Reference ranges used to identify kidney damage stage are dependent on the diagnostic tests being used. The reference range for diagnostic tests for determining albuminuria can be found in the Kidney Health Australia Caring for Australasians with Renal Impairment (KHA-CARI) Chronic Kidney Disease guidelines.

Collection methods:Help on this term

Timed urine collections (typically for a 24-hour period) are considered the gold standard for evaluating proteinuria and albuminuria status, but are logistically difficult and are subject to significant inaccuracies.

The recommended method for initial detection of kidney damage in both diabetic and non-diabetic individuals is urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) measurement in a first-void (first morning) spot specimen. Where a first-void specimen is not possible or practical, a random spot urine specimen for ACR is acceptable.

Comments:Help on this term

The terms albuminuria and proteinuria are often used synonymously in medical literature. However, albuminuria refers specifically to an abnormal level of albumin in the urine and proteinuria refers to abnormal levels of all of the proteins in the urine, which may or may not include albumin. Initial testing for albuminuria rather than proteinuria is the preferred approach in most individuals at risk of chronic kidney disease.

In settings where the monitoring of a person's health is ongoing and where a measure can change over time (such as general practice), the Patient—diagnosis date, DDMMYYYY should also be recorded.

Source and reference attributes

Submitting organisation:Help on this term

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

Origin:Help on this term

Kidney Health Australia (KHA) 2012. Caring for Australians with Renal Impairment (CARI) Guidelines. Diagnosis, classification and staging of chronic kidney disease. Sydney: KHA. Viewed 20 October 2015,  http://www.cari.org.au/CKD
/CKD%<BR>20early/Diag_Classification_Staging_ECKD.pdf
.

Johnson DW, Jones GR, Mathew TH, Ludlow MJ, Chadban SJ, Usherwood T et al. 2012. Chronic kidney disease and measurement of albuminuria or proteinuria: a position statement. Medical Journal of Australia 197(4):224-5.

Relational attributes

Related metadata references:Help on this term

See also Patient—diagnosis date, DDMMYYYY Health, Superseded 17/10/2018

See also Person—kidney damage marker (urine albumin level), total milligrams per 24 hours N[NNN].N Health, Candidate 15/05/2017

See also Person—kidney damage marker, urine albumin/creatinine ratio N[NN].N Health, Candidate 15/05/2017

Implementation in Data Set Specifications:Help on this term

Diabetes (clinical) NBPDS Health, Candidate 15/05/2017

DSS specific attributes +
My items Help on this term
Download Help on this term