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Case plan (Out-of-Home Care)

Identifying and definitional attributes

Metadata item type:Help on this termGlossary Item
Synonymous names:Help on this termCase and care plan
METeOR identifier:Help on this term532565
Registration status:Help on this termChildren and Families, Standard 22/11/2016
Community Services (retired), Recorded 04/10/2014
Definition:Help on this term

A case plan is an individualised, dynamic written plan or a support agreement that includes information on the circumstances explaining why the child is considered to be in need of protection, the goal of ongoing intervention and outcomes and actions required to achieve the goals. A case
plan is usually developed between the person and agency as a result of an
assessment process and usually includes:   

  • Goals and objectives;  
  • Planned measures/actions;       
  • Needs assessment (including: health, education, therapeutic social/cultural support);     
  • Family/relatives/kin contact arrangements; and      
  • Living/accommodation arrangements.

Case plans may also be referred to as case management plans or care plans. Provisional care plans are not included in the Child Protection National Minimum Data Set.

Context:Help on this term

The proportion of children and young people who have a current documented case plan is a measure under the National Standards for Out-of-Home Care. These standards state:

'The care planning process is to be focused on the wellbeing of the individual living in out-of-home care. The care plan is to include the views of the child and young person where appropriate and developed in partnership with carers, families and significant others. Where applicable, this approach will include cultural plans.' (FaHCSIA 2011).

Collection and usage attributes

Guide for use:Help on this term

A current case plan is one that has been approved and/or reviewed within the previous 12 months. Individual jurisdictions’ timeframes for ongoing review may vary and reviews may be more frequent when:

  • young children or infants are involved
  • the child has just entered care, and/or
  • certain orders are in place (e.g. assessment
    orders).

Reviews may also be required when circumstances have changed (e.g. death of a parent/carer, placement change) and significant new decisions are needed.

Reviews of case plans include assessing to what extent strategies have been implemented and any change in circumstances concerning the child’s needs (including the most appropriate living arrangement), development and safety. If a child has more than one review during the year, the relevant date is that of the most recent review during that year.

Source and reference attributes

Submitting organisation:Help on this term

Research, Evaluation and Data Working Group (REDWG).

Origin:Help on this term

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2013. Child protection national minimum data set, data collection manual 2012-13. AIHW: Canberra.

Reference documents:Help on this term

FaHCSIA (Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs) 2011. An outline of national standards for out-of-home care: A priority project under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children 2009-2020. FaHCSIA: Canberra.

Relational attributes

Metadata items which use this glossary item:Help on this term

Case plan required indicator Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

Child—case plan required indicator Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

Child—case plan required indicator, yes/no/not applicable/not stated/inadequately described code N Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

Child—current case plan indicator Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

Child—current case plan indicator, yes/no/not applicable/not stated/inadequately described code N Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

Current case plan indicator Children and Families, Standard 22/11/2016

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